Be Better: Training tips from Carson Wentz

Training tips from Carson Wentz and Sanford POWER

 

Pro quarterback Carson Wentz and Sanford POWER are teaming up to offer ongoing insight and education into athletic performance over a variety of topics:

Stretching:

Carson Wentz

“Stretching is so undervalued. I’ve learned it’s important to keep my body right and make sure its ready to go. Athletes can really limit a lot of pulled muscles by simply taking care of your body in that way.”

Sanford POWER

Stretching can be a confusing topic and is often times an individual prescription. Most current research suggests that athletes should use activation and dynamic movements prior to sport or training. If static holds are used prior to sport they should be limited in duration (10-30 seconds). At the conclusion of training or competition static stretching is often used with holds of longer duration (30-90 seconds).  Like most exercise prescription it is best to work with a certified strength coach or physical therapist to prescribe an exact stretching or training program that will best fit an individual athlete’s needs.
Here’s more information about Sanford POWER.

In-season strength training:

Carson Wentz

“It’s scaled back as far as how much I do, but I still do it twice a week. I don’t want to lose those gains I’ve worked so hard for in the offseason.”

Sanford POWER

Within 2-3 weeks of completing an offseason performance program an athlete begins to lose some of their hard earned strength gains.  This is why in-season performance training is important for athletes looking to not only maintain strength, but also to increase it during the competitive season. The frequency of these workouts is often twice per week with intensity remaining high but overall load reduced.  Most in-season workouts consist of an Olympic movement or Olympic progression, a variation of a squat or lunge and a push/pull exercise.
Here’s more information about Sanford POWER.

Being a multi-sport athlete:

Carson Wentz

As a kid, I tried to do a little bit of everything: Hockey, basketball, baseball, football, soccer – even golfing. It taught me how to compete and I really learned what kind of person I am in those environments.” 

Sanford POWER

POWER’s philosophy is aligned with the model for Long Term Athlete Development (LTAD) which is defined as: The managed developmental progression for an athlete that will both maximize their long-term potential and enjoyment in the sports they participate. POWER supports athletes playing multiple sports and provides athletic development programs for athletes of all ages and abilities.

Proper nutrition:

Carson Wentz

“Everyone kind of has their own plan. For me in college, it was about weight gain so I ate a lot of carbs and protein. Vegetables – even though no one likes them – are very, very important.”

Sanford POWER

A good nutrition plan can help athletes optimize their training, performance and recovery, but there is really no one-size-fits-all eating plan or diet an athlete can follow to make them perform better. The 2016 position statement of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine states that science-based recommendations can and should be tailored to develop a personalized nutrition plan that accounts for an athlete’s training schedule, preferences, goals, and success with different nutrition and hydration strategies.  Working with a Registered Dietitian can help athletes create a well-balanced food plan that contains adequate carbohydrates to fuel their muscles for exercise, protein to build and repair muscle, healthy fats and plenty of variety to help athletes meet their nutrition needs and optimize their sports performance.

Injury Prevention:

Carson Wentz

“When you’re a kid, you don’t realize how important injury prevention is to development. I’ve learned to really take care of my body with different exercises and stretching and eating right.”

Sanford POWER

Helping to reduce the incidence of injury for our athletes is a complex process made up of many parts. Sanford POWER takes great pride in providing our athletes with a number of resources to keep them performing at a high level. This starts with our degreed, certified and experienced staff that develops programming for our athletes. In addition, it’s providing detailed warm-up and activation methods before training sessions, as well as comprehensive training plans. We offering cutting-edge concussion research developed by the Sanford Sports Science Institute (SSSI) plus proper hydration and nutritional information from our sports dietitian. Also, the Sanford Health-researched knee injury prevention program is an available resource.

The Importance of Strength Training:

Carson Wentz

“Everyone has heard the story about me being 5-foot-8, 125 pounds when I was a (high school) freshman so I think I’ve come a long way, and a lot of that is due to strength and conditioning. It gets me ready to go for every season.”

Sanford POWER

Strength training develops the foundation for explosive athletic movements. POWER uses a variety of research-proven strength training methods to form the core of our program. Each athlete is taught proper movement patterns followed by strength and power development. This proper progression yields a stronger, more explosive and injury-resistant athlete.”

Post Training Recovery:

Carson Wentz

“It’s making sure I’m eating right. Ice tubs and hot tubs – and stretching is huge, too. Doing different things to make sure your body is right before you compete.”

Sanford POWER

The hours after training/competition are just as important as the hours spent in the gym.  An athlete should replenish energy stores after a workout with protein and carbohydrates. Different modalities such as foam rolling, contrast bathing, mobility work and various forms of stretching all can be used to enhance the recovery process. Sleep is often times overlooked, but is a critical component of recovery for athletes of all ages.